The Flash – OneLittleHook Superhero Series

 

Tools and Materials
1/2 skein Caron Simply Soft in Harvest Red
Scrap amount of Caron Simply Soft in Sunshine
Scrap amount of Baby Bee Sweet Delight in Naked
1/2 hank embroidery floss in white
Scrap amount of Red Heart With Love in White
White sewing thread
3.25mm crochet hook
1.65mm crochet hook (only used for crocheting the circle detail on the chest)
Scissors
Yarn needle
Sewing needle
Small curved upholstery needle (not necessary, but recommended if attaching white circle to chest after doll body is completed, see notes in White Circle on Chest section)
Polyester fiber filling

Terms
sc – single crochet
sc2tog – single crochet two together or invisible decrease
st – stitch
sts – stitches
sl st – slip stitch

Pattern Notes
This pattern is worked in a spiral.  Use stitch markers to keep track of the “rounds”.  Weave in ends as you go.

Arms (Make 2)
Make an adjustable ring with the red yarn.
R1. 6sc in the ring, pull to tighten (6)
R2. 2sc in each st around (12)
R3-23. 1sc in each st around (12)
Cut yarn, fasten off, weave in ends.  Stuff the arms – be sure to only stuff lightly near the tops so that the arms lay down next to the body.

Legs (Make 2)
Make an adjustable ring with the sunshine yarn.
R1. 6sc in the ring, pull to tighten (6)
R2. 2sc in each st around (12)
R3-9. 1sc in each st around (12)
Color change to red and continue
R10-20. 1sc in each st around (12)
Leg 1: cut yarn, fasten off, weave in ends
Leg 2: do not cut yarn, ch 2 and continue with torso section below

Torso
In this section, you will be joining the legs, then working the torso, and then attaching the arms towards the end.  You may want to use stitch markers to keep track of the chains and stitches in the first 2 rounds of this section.

R1. line up the legs so that the side where you changed colors is in the back, then begin crocheting around leg 1 by placing 1sc in each st around, place 1sc in each top loop only of the ch2 that was made at the end of leg 2, 1sc in each st around leg 2 (28 – 12 sts from each leg and the ch2 will count as 4 sts)20171101_211935

R2. 1sc in each of the bottom loops from the ch2 that was made at the end of leg 2, continue with 1sc in each st around (28)

R3-12. 1sc in each st around (28)

Stuff the legs

R13. 1sc in each of the first 10 sts, sc2tog, 1sc in each of the next 11 sts, sc2tog, 1sc in each of the last 3 sts (26)

R14. 1sc in each of the first 9 sts, sc2tog, 1sc in each of the next 10 sts, sc2tog, 1sc in each of the last 3 sts (24)

R15. *1sc in each of the next 9 sts, sc2tog*, repeat *to* once, 1sc in each of the last 2 sts (22)

R16. *1sc in each of the next 9 sts, sc2tog*, repeat *to* to finish the round (20)

R17. *1sc in each of the next 8 sts, sc2tog*, repeat *to* to finish the round (18)

R18. 1sc in each of the first 8 sts, sc2tog, 1sc in each of the next 6 sts, sc2tog (16)

R19. 1sc in each of the first 7 sts, sc2tog, 1sc in each of the next 5 sts, sc2tog (14)

This next part is where we will be attaching the arms.  See note in White Circle on Chest section on attaching white circle to chest before proceeding.* 

R20. 1sc in each of the first 12 sts, hold one arm up to the active row (be sure to place the side of the arm where the color changes were made against the side of the body) and place 1 sc into the next st making sure to start by inserting your hook through the 2 loops on the outside of the arm, then through the 2 loops on the inside of the arm, then through the 2 loops in the torso, yarn over, and draw through all 6 loops, then yarn over and draw through the last loop.  You will do one more crochet this way in the next st to complete this round (14)

R21. continue attaching arm with 4 more single crochets as described in the previous round, 1 sc in each of the next 2 sts, attach second arm with 1 sc in each of the next 6 sts, 1 sc in each of the last 2 sts (14)

Continue with neck/head section below.

Neck/Head
Continue with the red yarn
R1. 1sc in each st around (14)

Stuff the body

For the color changes in this section I didn’t bother to cut and weave in all of those ends.20171103_141653  I just sort of let them hang out in the middle there and went about my business.  They did come loose a little bit as I was crocheting, but before I stuffed the head, I was able to pull on them a little to tighten them and the stuffing ended up holding everything in place.  You could always tapestry crochet here, but since I’m a thrifty crafter and used the yarns that I already had on hand, they weren’t exact weight matches.  So, while you could tapestry crochet the red around the naked yarn, I wouldn’t advise doing the tapestry crochet method with the naked around the red yarn.20171103_141721

R2. 1sc in each of the first 3 sts, change color to naked, 1sc in the fourth st, 2sc in the fifth st, 1sc in each of the next 2 sts, 2sc in the eighth st, 1sc in the ninth st, change color to red, 1sc in each of the last 5 sts (16)

R3. 2sc in the first st, 1sc in each of the next 2 sts, change color to naked, 2sc in the fourth st, 2sc in the fifth st, 1sc in the sixth st, 2sc in the seventh st, 2sc in the eighth st, 1sc in the ninth st, 2sc in the tenth st, 2sc in the eleventh st, change color to red, 1sc in the twelfth st, 1sc in the thirteenth st, 2sc in the fourteenth st, 1sc in the fifteenth st, 1sc in the sixteenth st (24)

R4. For this round you will follow the sequence: 2sc in the first st, 1sc in each of the next 2 sts, change color to naked in the 5th st, change color to red in the 19th st (32)

R5. For this round you will follow the sequence: 2sc in the first st, 1sc in each of the next 3 sts, change color to naked in the 7th st, change color to red at the red in the 25th st (40)

R6. 1sc in each st around, change color to naked in the 9th st, change color to red in the 31st st (40)

R7. repeat R6 (40)
R8. repeat R6 (40)
R9. repeat R6 (40)

Cut naked yarn, fasten off, weave in end, and continue with red yarn.

R10-17. 1sc in each st around (40)

R18. *sc2tog, 1sc in each of the next 3 sts*, repeat *to* around (32)

R19. *sc2tog, 1sc in each of the next 2 sts*, repeat *to* around (24)

Stuff the neck and head, add more stuffing as needed as you close up the head.

R20. *sc2tog, 1sc in the next st*, repeat *to* around (16)

R21. *sc2tog*, repeat *to* around (8)

Cut red yarn leaving about a 10 inch tail and fasten off.  Thread this tail onto your yarn needle and whipstitch through the top loop of all 8 sts, then pull to tighten and close up the hole.  Insert the yarn needle through the middle of the top of the head and bring it out of the back of the head, then weave it in to secure it and cut off any excess yarn.

Ears (Make 2)
Make an adjustable ring with the sunshine yarn.  Be sure to leave a tail about 10 inches long on this starting ring.
20171104_135443
R1. 6sc in the ring, pull to tighten but be sure to leave a small opening (just big enough to fit your crochet hook in) (6)

R2. 2sc in each st around (12)

Sl st into the next st.  Do not cut yarn or fasten off just yet.  Pull the active loop out a little bit and remove your hook from the active loop.

20171104_142249Using your crochet hook, draw the 10 inch tail from the starting ring through the middle hole so that it is hanging out of the right side of the ear.  Next, insert your crochet hook into the middle hole by going in the right side.  Put the active loop on your hook and pull to tighten, but not too tight as you do not want to cause the ear to become misshapen. Now, pull the active loop through the middle hole, and using the tail that you previously brought through this hole, create a chain 5.

20171105_121714

 

Pull that tail you’ve just chained 5 with through to finish off, weave in end by weaving down the ch5 and into the circle.  Cut the yarn that is still attached to the skein about 10 inches long, thread this length onto your yarn needle and sew it to the side of the head to create the ear.

 

White Circle on Chest
Make an adjustable ring with the white embroidery floss.

R1. 6sc in the ring, pull to tighten (6)
R2. 2sc in each st around (12)
R3. *2sc in the first st, 1sc in the next st*, repeat *to* around (18)
R4. *2sc in the first st, 1sc in each of the next 2 sts*, repeat *to* around (24)
Sl st into the next st, cut yarn, fasten off, weave in ends.  Sew the circle to Flash’s chest using the white sewing thread and sewing needle.

*You may want to consider attaching the white circle before proceeding to the head/neck section.

If attaching the white circle to the chest after the doll is completely sewn up, then I found that a curved upholstery needle works the best, but really just use whichever method works best for you.

Flash Finishing Details
Wrist detail: Thread a 20 inch length of sunshine yarn onto your yarn needle.  Insert into the back of the arm towards the bottom and come out of the back of the arm between the 7th and 8th row (be sure to leave a short tail to tie off with at the end).  Begin sewing in a zigzag fashion starting at point A in the diagram below, insert your needle and thread into point B, bring it out at point C, insert into point B again, bring it out at point D, *insert into point C, bring it out at point E, insert into point D, bring it out at point F*, repeat *to* around.  Once you get all the way around you may find that one zigzag will need to be longer in order to connect to the starting point and that’s okay.  Finish by bringing your needle out in the same spot where you first inserted and gently tie the two tails together to secure, then cut excess lengths of yarn and tuck the knot inside of arm to hide it.flash wrist detail

Lightning Bolt on Chest:  Thread a 20 inch length of sunshine yarn onto your yarn needle.  Insert into the back of the doll and through the front at point A, leaving a short tail to tie off with at the end.  Insert your needle and thread at point B, bring it out at point A, insert at point B again, *bring it out at point C, insert at point D*, repeat *to* once, bring your needle out at point A, insert at point D, bring it out in the back at the point where you first inserted.  Finish by gently tying the two tails together, cut excess yarn lengths, and tuck the knot into the body to hide it.

flash chest emblemWaist Detail: Thread a 30 inch length of sunshine yarn onto your yarn needle.  Insert into the back of the doll bringing it out at point A, insert into point B, bring out at point C, insert into point B again, out at point C again, insert at point D, bring it out at point E, insert into point D again, bring it out at point  again, insert into point F, bring it out at point G, insert into point F again, out at point G again, insert into point H, bring it out at point A, insert into point H, bring it out of the back at the same place you first inserted your needle and yarn.  Finish by gently tying the two tails together, cut excess yarn lengths, and tuck the knot into the body to hide it.

flash belt diagram2

Eyes: Thread a 20 inch length of white yarn onto your yarn needle and insert into the back of the head, bring out at point A, *insert into point B, bring out of point A again*, repeat *to* two more times, insert at point C, bring out at point A, insert at point C again, bring out at point E, insert at point D, bring out at point E, insert at point D, bring it out of the back at the same place you first inserted your needle and yarn.  Finish by gently tying the two tails together, cut excess yarn lengths, and tuck the knot into the head to hide it. Repeat this process in reflection to create the second eye.

flash eye

Please visit my OneLittleHook facebook community group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/139653136590869/ to post pictures of your finished Flash or other projects you may be working on.

Pattern created by Julie at OneLittleHook.com.  You are welcome to sell items you’ve handcrafted from this pattern.  I politely request credit for this pattern be referenced to http://www.OneLittleHook.com or to https://www.facebook.com/OneLittleHook.  Please share this pattern by sharing the link – If you LIKE IT, LINK IT.

Thank you and enjoy!

 

 

Easy Peasy Eye Emboidery Tutorial

Embroidering eyes onto your amigurumi may seem like an impossible feat, but it really can be done AND it’s actually quite easy.  So, gather up your materials, fill up your wine glass, and let’s get to work!

Tools and Materials
~Embroidery thread in black, white, and iris color of your choice (I’ll be using green in this tutorial)20171116_135844

~Scissors

~Thin crochet hook or yarn needle

~Straight pins

~Crewel needle (this is basically a sewing needle that has an eye large enough for embroidery thread to fit through)

~Practice ball*

 

*To create a practice ball you will need to crochet a simple ball shape in the normal yarn and size that you would typically use for amigurumi.

 

We will be creating the pupils first.  To do this use the straight pins to mark where you would like the center of the eyes to be on your practice ball.  Then, thread the black floss onto your needle like in the picture to the right. 20171117_134751

If your practice ball is about 2.5 inches in diameter, like mine is, then you’ll want to cut about a 10 inch length of the black thread.  Larger practice balls would need a little longer length of thread.  

 

Step One: Beginning with the eye on your right (which will be the ami’s left eye), insert the needle BETWEEN crochets about 6 stitches away from the pin marking the pupil position.  Bring the needle out of the practice ball in the place where the pin marker is (this will now be referred to as point A).  Be sure to leave a short tail hanging from the insertion point as this will be used to tie off later.  Remove pin marker.20171117_135139

 

Use the diagram below regarding point placement.pupil diagram

Step Two: Insert the needle in point B and bring it back out at point A in the same stitch.  Repeat once.  20171117_140423

Step Three: Insert the needle at point C and bring it back out at point D in the same stitch.  Insert the needle at point C again and bring it back out at the original insertion point.  20171117_140529

Note: If you feel you need more coverage – which you may if you are working with a larger practice ball – then go ahead and add a few stitches in the same manner.  Don’t worry if you don’t have a perfect circle shape.

To finish off gently tie both of the threads together and cut off the excess thread.  Use the thin crochet hook or yarn needle to tuck that little knot back into the head to hide it (see photos below). Repeat process in reflection to create other pupil.

3pinc

 

Next, we will be creating the iris.  Use the diagram below regarding point placement.

Step Four: Cut about a 20-inch length of thread in the color of your choice, thread onto the needle (the same way as the threaded black yarn photo before step one), and insert one row below where you inserted when beginning the pupil.  Bring needle out above the pupil and just a little to the right.  We’ll call this point E.  Again, be sure to leave a short tail hanging from the insertion point as this will be used to tie off later.

*Insert the needle at point F.  Bring it out at point G.

Insert at point H.  Bring it out at point I.  iris diagram

Insert at point E.  Bring it out at point F.

Insert at point G.  Bring it out at point H.

Insert at point I.*  Bring it out at point E.

Repeat *to* around just next to the circle of iris that you just made.  Once you get to the last step where you insert at point I, you will then exit on the side in the same place where you first inserted.  If you feel like you need more coverage, then go ahead and make another round(s) in this same manner next to the one that you just made.  To finish off gently tie both of the threads together and cut off the excess length.  Use the thin crochet hook or yarn needle to tuck that little knot back into the head to hide it.  Repeat process in reflection to create other iris.

iris 4 steps

 

In this next section we will create the white area of the eyes and a little glint.  Use the diagram below regarding point placement.

eye white and glint

Step Five: Cut about a 20-inch length of white embroidery floss, thread it onto the needle, and insert one row below where you inserted when beginning the iris.  Bring needle out a little to the right of point E.  We will call this point J.

Insert into point K.  Bring the needle out at point L.

Insert at point M.  Bring the needle out at the top right star and insert the needle just below (a few millimeters) to create a glint in the eye.  Bring the needle out at point K.

Insert at point L.  Bring the needle out at the top of the bottom left star and insert just below (a few millimeters) to create a second glint in the eye.  Bring it out at point J.

Add another round of white by following the pattern: Out at J, in at K, out at L, in at M, out at K, in at L, out at original white thread insertion point on the side of the head.

To finish off gently tie both of the threads together and cut off the excess length.  Use the thin crochet hook or yarn needle to tuck that little knot back into the head to hide it.  Repeat process in reflection to create other white and glint(s).

20171120_123306

 

In this last section we will be creating the eyelids and eyelashes.  Use the diagram below regarding point placement.

Step Six:  Thread a 20-inch length of black embroidery floss onto your needle.  Insert the needle BETWEEN crochets about 6 rows away from the top of the eye.  Bring the needle out just to the left of point M.  We’ll call this point N.

Insert the needle at point O.  Bring it out at point P.

Insert at point O again.  Bring it outeyelash diagram at point Q.

Insert at point O again Bring it out at point R.

Insert at point S.  Bring it out where you first inserted at the beginning of this section.

Finish off by gently tying these two ends together and cut off the excess length.  Use the thin crochet hook or yarn needle to tuck that little knot back into the head to hide it.  Repeat the process in reflection to create the eyelid and lashes on the other eye.

 

eyelid eyelash

FINISHED! And embellished with nose, mouth, and hair.

eyes finished

 

 

Tutorial notes:

The pupil is similar to the satin stitch in traditional embroidery and the iris and whites of the eyes along with the eyebrow and lashes are similar to the backstitch.

Keep in mind that the more you practice your new eye embroidery skills, the more proficient you will become.  Just like in crochet, the more you practice the better you become.  Most of you reading this can probably crochet a scarf of ball shape with your eyes closed!  With enough practice you will no doubt have people asking you to teach them how to embroider eyes!

Be sure to subscribe to my blog at www.onelittlehook.com to stay up to date on new content, patterns and giveaways, and random editorials and tutorials like this.  Happy Hooking!

Please visit my OneLittleHook Facebook community group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/139653136590869/ to post pictures of your projects; get crochet tips, tricks, or help; and to connect with other lovers of crochet!

My Tips For Selling On Etsy

I was inspired to write this post because I come across this very topic all the time in the various crochet groups that I love being a part of.  I, myself, have struggled with this very subject and was left feeling very defeated.  That’s when I decided to research and really figure out what it would take to sell my handicrafts in this extremely competitive marketplace.

In my research, I scoured through many articles saying the same vague info…  you need to have the right product, a certain je ne sais quoi, etc…, but nothing ever specific.  Or worse, courses you have to pay for to get advice.

First, you need to look at what you’re offering and be critical.  Is your product a dime a dozen?  If you make amigurumi, then take a walk down the toy aisle at any given store.  If you find something similar, then it’s time to reconsider what you’re making.  Same goes for crocheters who make accessories like hats, scarves, backpacks or handbags, and garments.  Spend a day cruising popular clothing stores and make a note of what there is an oversupply of so you know what to avoid.

The key is to get ahead of upcoming trends.  A great way to find out what to make is to look at baby, wedding, toy, home decor, and fashion magazines.  These give great insight as to what styles and colors are on-trend for the season before they flood the market.  (Money Saving Tip: Check to see if your local library has current magazine issues, this way you can read them for free.)

Material.  Yes, yarn is expensive, and acrylic yarn is an awesome product that comes in a zillion variations at affordable prices, but anyone can buy a commercially made product of comparable materials for far less than what you would need to charge to cover materials and labor.  If you are making an item for a baby, you may want to consider organic materials.  If you are making an item for sale as a wedding gift or home decor item, you may want to consider using a more luxurious material.  This reason alone is enough to charge enough money to cover material and labor.

Time of year is also a factor in any business’ sales.  Toy sales are higher around November and December.  Clothing sales are higher in spring and fall.  Baby and Wedding sales are more of a spring, summer, or fall time of year.

Consider where you advertise.  I sell amigurumi patterns and advertise them in my beloved crochet groups on Facebook.  The wonderful people in these groups can already crochet themselves (or are looking to learn) so a pattern on how to crochet a particular item would be something these folks would be interested in.  Typically, these are not the people that would want to buy a finished crocheted item.  Take a look at what you are selling and think of the type of person who would be interested in that particular item, then advertise it in that type of group.  Be sure to read the group’s rules for posting. (Group Tip: I recommend avoiding business groups as these groups tend to be filled with sellers, not buyers.)

Once you have an idea of what you want to create and with what materials, go out and find a fabulous pattern!  There are a plethora of patterns out there on the internet.  Check websites like Craftsy, Ravelry, Etsy, Pinterest, and Google.  Many patterns are free but don’t shy away from paid patterns either.  I often find some of the most beautiful patterns are paid ones. (Also, you’ll be supporting a fellow maker by purchasing a pattern.)  Just remember, if you sell a few items from that one paid pattern, then it most definitely has paid for itself.  Be sure to refer the pattern designer on your listing as typically noted on patterns.   

In a nutshell… When trying to figure out how to get buyers to trade you their money for your product–materials, color, and style are important attributes to consider.  Examples: I created this black, white, and red, visually stimulating crochet book for babies out of 100% organic cotton (materials set you apart).  I created this boho chic baby layette set (style sets you apart) with the option to be customized (wording signals and added cost) in 100% organic cotton (now you’ve got material and style that sets you apart).  I created this throw blanket and/or decorative pillow set out of 100% cashmere.  Check out this faux leather and/or cool color festival top.  Etc…

Before I go there are a couple of topics I feel that I need to mention… First, use good pictures.  This subject was mentioned over and over in “how to improve my online sales” articles along with elaborate ways to photograph like a pro.  Let me just say this: on all of the online listings that I saw, I have NOT seen one photo that would’ve steered me away from the product.  If, by chance, someone who is reading this has their listings photographed on top of a pile of dirty laundry, dishes, or other clutter/randomness, then please retake the pictures with a plain background.  You can easily use white printer paper, construction paper, or scrapbook paper (my personal favorite).  Second, there are crocheted creations that are more of a work of art than a toy.  If you are selling a work of art, then be sure to advertise where you would expect to find art lovers, doll collectors, or other fans of your subject matter.  Also, I’ve seen teddy bears that are so beautifully done that they might be considered both a work of art and a toy; at this point, you might want to advertise it as home decor or heirloom gifts.

Be sure to subscribe to my blog at www.onelittlehook.com to stay up to date on new content, patterns and giveaways, and random editorials like this.  Happy Hooking!

Please visit my OneLittleHook Facebook community group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/139653136590869/ to post pictures of your projects; get crochet tips, tricks, or help; and to connect with other lovers of all things crochet!

Kodama Inspired Doll

This one is for all you Hayao Miyazaki fans… a kodama inspired crochet doll from the wonderful Miyazaki film Princess Mononoke.  I created this doll as a request from a friend.  This friend of mine is a HUGE fan of Miyazaki and has a small collection of his movies that she was kind enough to lend to me.

Before this, the only anime that I had previously heard of was Sailor Moon, which I was a HUGE fan of.  I know, I know, that’s like only knowing vanilla ice cream and then being shown that there are a TON of other delicious flavors.  Still, vanilla is a good staple.

Anyways, I did watch all of those Miyazaki movies and they were absolutely amazing!  They had an incredible way of telling a story that had several meanings, lessons, or morals meticulously weaved throughout the films.

When I set out to pick up supplies for this kodama, I had envisioned shell buttons for the eyes and mouth because I wanted to create the illusion of transparency in those features to more closely resemble the look of the kodama in the movie.  When I got to the store, I happened to find a more perfect looking button for the eyes… a glossy grey-black with a white etching.  You can find them here and since I changed up the eye buttons, I settled on a 14mm shank-post, glossy black button for the mouth.  When using shank-post buttons, be sure to secure very tightly between crochets, otherwise, the buttons may protrude a teensy bit from the head of the kodama.

A downloadable version of this pattern is available on Craftsy and Ravelry.

Without any further ado, I present to you, my pattern for the kodama tree spirit which, to me, helped the viewer connect to just how much life there is in the forest.

Tools and Materials
3.5mm crochet hook
Yarn needle
Scissors
Stitch markers
1 skein Red Heart With Love or Red Heart Soft yarn in white
Buttons for eyes and mouth
Scrap of black moulin embroidery thread for nose (optional)
White polyester fiber filling (Maker Tip: Be sure to look for a bright white filling since blue-tinted or green-tinted filling will show through and give the illusion of a dirty finished product)

Tools and Materials For Optional Posable Head (Pictured)*
6in length of craft wire
Small cork cut in half
Snips or scissors to cut the wire and cork
Thin screwdriver or other puncture tool to punch guide hole through cork

*Posable head option should NOT be used if a small child will be handling the finished product as the craft wire could protrude through the stuffing and yarn causing injury.

Terms (US)
sc – single crochet
st – stitch
sts – stitches
sc2tog – single crochet two together

This pattern is worked in a spiral. Use stitch markers to keep track of the “rounds”. Weave in loose ends as you go except where instructed to leave a tail for sewing.

Arms (make 2)

Make an adjustable ring

R1. 6sc in the ring (6)

R2. 2 sc in each st around (12)

R3-15, 1 sc in each st around (12)

Cut yarn leaving about a 10 inch tail for sewing and fasten off.

Torso

Make an adjustable ring

R1. 6 sc in the ring (6)

R2. 2 sc in each st around (12)

R3. *2sc in the first st, 1sc in the next st*, repeat *to* to finish the round (18)

R4. *2sc in the first st, 1sc in each of the next 2 sts*, repeat *to* to finish the round (24)

R5. *2sc in the first st, 1sc in each of the next 3 sts*, repeat *to* to finish the round (30)

R6. *2sc in the first st, 1sc in each of the next 4 sts*, repeat *to* to finish the round (36)

R7-16. 1sc in each st around (36)

Cut yarn leaving about a 15 inch tail for sewing and fasten off.

Torso Bottom

Make same as torso stopping after R6.  Cut yarn and fasten off.

Legs (make 2)

Make an adjustable ring

R1. 6sc in the ring (6)

R2. 2sc in each st around (12)

R3. *2sc in the first st, 1sc in the next st*, repeat *to* to finish the round (18)

R4-10. 1sc in each st around (18)

Cut yarn leaving about a 10 inch tail for sewing and fasten off.

Bottom of Legs (make 2)

Make same as legs stopping after R3.  Cut yarn and fasten off.

Head

Make an adjustable ring

R1. 8sc in the ring (8)

R2. 2sc in each st around (16)

R3. *2sc in the first st, 1sc in the next st*, repeat *to* to finish the round (24)

R4. *2sc in the first st, 1sc in each of the next 2 sts*, repeat *to* to finish the round (32)

R5. *2sc in the first st, 1sc in each of the next 3 sts*, repeat *to* to finish the round (40)

R6. *2sc in the first st, 1sc in each of the next 4 sts*, repeat *to* to finish the round (48)

R7-20. 1sc in each st around (48)

R21. *sc2tog in the first 2 sts, 1sc in each of the next 4 sts*, repeat *to* to finish the round (40)

R22. *sc2tog in the first 2 sts, 1sc in each of the next 3 sts*, repeat *to* to finish the round (32)

R23. *sc2tog in the first 2 sts, 1sc in each of the next 2 sts*, repeat *to* to finish the round (24)

Cut yarn leaving about a 15 inch tail for sewing and fasten off.

Assembly

  1. Stuff arms leaving the top of arms only slightly stuffed.  Sew arms closed then sew to the torso. 
  2. Stuff legs.  Sew leg bottom to legs.  Add more stuffing as needed while sewing the leg bottoms onto the legs.
  3. Sew the eyes, mouth, and optional nose detail onto the head to create the face.
  4. Begin to sew the head onto the body.  (Maker Tip: Use a contrasting light-colored yarn to weave a guideline around the torso to mark where the head should be sewn on.)
  5. OPTIONAL STEP.  Cut craft wire 6 inches long.  Cut cork in half.  Using the small screwdriver or puncture tool, create a guide hole in the first piece of cork.  Insert the craft wire into the guide hole so that about 1/4in of craft wire is sticking out of the end of the cork and bend that 1/4in section over onto the cork to secure it.  Insert the uncorked end of the craft wire through the top of the torso so that the uncorked end will be inside of the torso.  Hold in place and add stuffing all around the cork piece inside the head.  Finish sewing on the head adding more stuffing as needed.  Add second cork piece to the uncorked end of craft wire and secure using the same method as the first cork piece.
  6. Begin to sew torso bottom onto the torso.  Stuff the torso making sure to add stuffing all around the cork piece (if using this option).  Finish sewing torso bottom onto torso adding more stuffing as needed.
  7. Sew legs onto the front of the torso.

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Pattern created by Julie Forsey at OneLittleHook.com.  Please do not distribute or sell this pattern.  You are welcome to sell items you’ve handcrafted from this pattern.  I politely request credit for this pattern be referenced to http://www.OneLittleHook.com or to https://www.facebook.com/OneLittleHook.  Thank you and enjoy!

My First Blog Post

Hello Everyone! Welcome to my very first blog post! I thought I’d take this opportunity to tell you a bit about myself and to invite you to tell me a bit about yourself.

I decided to start this blog so I could share with and hopefully connect with other people on the wonderful and fascinating topic of crochet!

I’ve always loved creating things and as a little girl, I often created doll clothing from my mom’s old nightgowns. I learned the craft of crochet from my sister-in-law and immediately fell in love with it. It’s an art that I never get bored of and one where the master is always schooling the student. 😉 thanks sis

Some of my favorite things to crochet are dolls, doll clothing and accessories, animals, handbags, barefoot sandals, and baby booties and blankets. One crochet classic that I’ve never made, but hope to someday, is the granny square afghan.

I would love to hear about how you learned to crochet and what some of your favorite things to make are.